New American Bible (NAB, NABRE)

New American Bible (NAB, NABRE)

Published in 1970, the New American Bible (NAB) was the first Catholic Bible to use the original biblical languages of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek as the base text, rather than the Latin Vulgate. This approach was inspired by the encyclical Divino afflante spiritu, issued by Pope Pius XII in 1943, and strengthened by Pope John Paul II's remarks almost 60 years later. The NABRE, released in 2011, is a revised version that aims to maintain a more literal and accurate translation of the Old Testament while still using contemporary English. It is the only Bible approved for Mass in the United States and the Philippines. The Jerusalem Bible, first published in 1966, holds a similar esteem worldwide outside of the US and Canada.

The NABRE, a Bible translation by Catholic scholars, is based on the original biblical languages of Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic. In 2010, it was granted the imprimatur by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, according to the Code of Canon Law, officially authorizing it for study and devotional reading. This is a significant update to the 1970 publication of the New American Bible (NAB) by the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD). As a Catholic-originated translation, the NABRE includes the complete Catholic Bible canon, including the seven Old Testament deuterocanonical books.